Stop Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop and Start Living Fully

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“Use your precious moments to live life fully every single second of every single day.” ~Marcia Wieder

I recently came back from an amazing vacation overseas with my family. All of our travel went smoothly, everyone stayed healthy, and there wasn’t any drama or conflict among family members. Other than one flight being delayed, it was perfect.

On the way home from the trip my heart and soul were soaring from the fun we had enjoyed, savoring the memories in my mind and feeling grateful. I noticed, though, that when I returned home my mind slowly started to shift. Not because of the usual dread of coming back from vacation, but rather because things actually continued to go well at home.

My adjustment to my jet lag was fine, and the first day back at work was actually nice. By all measures I should have continued to feel pretty happy! Instead, I began to anticipate that something bad would happen.

I could hear the voice in my head reminding me that I had just enjoyed ten days of vacation, so surely it was time for something negative to take place—a cold, stress at work, something.

It was almost as if I was inviting something bad into my life to temper the positivity I was feeling in the moment.

Some people describe this is as “waiting for the other shoe to drop,” and in my family we called it “Catholic guilt.”

As I’ve grown older, I’ve done this a little too often, in several different areas of life.

If my kids have been healthy for a good stretch, I start to have sneaky thoughts about how they’re “due soon” for a bout of some type of illness.

If my finances are under control, I’ll wonder if we’ll have an unexpected repair that will take us off course.

It’s not a concern if those thoughts float in and out, but I seem to have problems when they linger and begin to detract from what I am doing in the present.

The truth is that life does change constantly, and there are ebbs and flows between happiness and pain.

In one instant our situations can shift so drastically that we will be left reeling, so expecting that every day will be wonderful is obviously both unrealistic and unhelpful. Yet I’ve found that anxiously awaiting some sort of tragedy or pain often diminishes my current happiness.

Waiting for the other shoe to drop is this tricky way that we rob ourselves of a good feeling in the now because we are nervously anticipating something negative in the future.

A balance between fear about the future and a naive optimism is possible; we could call this space living fully.

Living fully is where we acknowledge that life will bring suffering and beauty, pain and happiness, challenge and comfort, and it will all come at different times. If we live fully, we do our best to float gracefully between these times, aiming not to get “stuck” in a space of overwhelming tension.

This is not an easy task, but below are some suggestions for those who want to decide not to wait in constant fear of that other shoe dropping.

Tips for Living Fully

1. Find time to be present.

The beauty of being present is that, by definition, it doesn’t allow you to be anywhere else. When you find time to be in the moment, anticipatory thoughts about bad things happening may enter your mind, but you will gently and swiftly guide them to the side.

Each of us has our unique ways of being present, whether it be a yoga class or exercise, quiet observation of nature, or meditation. Even a few minutes of quiet can be helpful in getting centered and focused.

2. Try savoring.

Just like you might enjoy a good glass of wine or a bite of cheesecake, you can also savor positive emotions or events.

For example, I could recall the vacation I took overseas, reliving a particularly fun outing or adventure. I could talk about the trip with my family and coworkers, and look at pictures. As I do that I would begin to bring back those memories, and those positive emotions associated with these memories would also come back.

3. Introduce some logic to your thoughts.

Sometimes our thoughts can run away from us, going down a path that we know isn’t logical or helpful.

In the case of anticipating something negative, I’ve found that I can best stop the thoughts with this simple reasoning: “Yes, it is inevitable that something bad will happen at some point, but I don’t know when or where. So, I might as well enjoy what I’m feeling now so later I won’t regret not having enjoyed that time when things were going well.”

4. Practice gratitude.

Being aware of what we have in our lives orients us to the present. We can always find something or someone to appreciate, and in showing this appreciation we gain an increased awareness of its beauty.

Expressing gratitude can be private (e.g., keeping a gratitude journal or list) or public (e.g., writing a letter of thanks to someone), but I’m preferential to personal reminders of gratitude.

For example, when I am feeling the joy of doing something I love or spending time with friends and family, I try to remember to say to myself: “this moment is good.” Just saying that brings me to the present and acknowledges my gratitude in the moment.

5. Spend time with people who also like to live fully.

It’s no mystery that emotions can be contagious. Friends or loved ones who are perpetually negative can influence our mindset, particularly if we find ourselves feeling anxious or dreading something negative happening.

While we shouldn’t avoid or shun friends who are struggling, we can be purposeful about finding time to spend with those who give us a burst of positive energy through their ability to live fully.

Our lives are in flux, and change is inevitable. By not constantly waiting for the bad stuff to happen, and instead focusing on the now, we can flow more easily, joyfully, and fully through our days.

Profile photo of Lisa Edwards

About Lisa Edwards

Lisa Edwards, PhD is a psychologist and professor who writes about positive psychology, motherhood and faculty life at hopefulmama.com. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

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The post Stop Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop and Start Living Fully appeared first on Tiny Buddha.


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

186: A Step-By-Step Guide to How I Write a Blog Post

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How I Write a Blog Post – My Step-By-Step Process

Today, I want to walk you through my step by step process for writing a blog post!

I get asked about this regularly over in the ProBlogger podcast listeners Facebook group today put together some notes on the workflow I use and want to run  you through it.

Before I do – and speaking of the Facebook group – I wanted to let you know that I’ve shared some exciting news with members of that group  in the last week – particularly about an event that ProBlogger is involved in running later this year in the US.

We’ve not fully launched the event yet publically but if you’re curious about coming to an event that ProBlogger is collaborating on – head to the Facebook group and check it out.

But enough of that! – let’s get into today episode.

Further Resources on A Step-By-Step Guide to How I Write a Blog Post

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Good day, it’s Darren from ProBlogger. Welcome to Episode 186 of the ProBlogger Podcast. My name is Darren Rowse and I’m the blogger behind ProBlogger.com, a blog, podcast, event, job board and series of ebooks all designed to help you as a blogger to start a blog, to grow that blog’s audience, to create some really useful content for that audience and to make some money from your blog.

Today, I want to walk you through my step by step process for writing a blog post. I get asked quite regularly over in the ProBlogger podcast listeners group on Facebook about my writing process. Whilst I’ve talked about different aspects of my process, various episodes of this podcast, I’ve never really gone from start to finish. Today, I want to walk you through it.

Before I do, I just did give you a little hint, that we’ve got some events coming up with ProBlogger. This year, we are planning to do an Australian event. In fact, there may be more than one, we’ll let you know a little bit more about that in the coming weeks. But we also, this year, want to do something in the US because we do have so many of our readers of ProBlogger, listeners of this podcast in the US.and speaking of the Facebook group – I wanted to let you know that I’ve shared some exciting news with members of that group  in the last week – particularly about an event that ProBlogger is involved in running later this year in the US. This year, we are planning an event in the US.

Whilst we’re not quite ready to launch details of that quite yet, I’m working with some partners on this particular event, we have let some details slip out in the Facebook group. We wanted to do a bit of a soft launch. If you’re curious about coming to an event in the US, go join the ProBlogger Podcast Listeners Facebook Group. Do a search on Facebook for ProBlogger Podcast Listeners and you will find the group. Join and you will find some details in there. By the time this episodes comes out, you may even be able to pick up an early bird ticket to that event. If you’re curious about coming to an event in the US, check out the Facebook group. If you’re in Australia or willing to come to Australia later in the year, stay tuned, we’ll let you know a little bit more about that.

But enough of all that, enough of me teasing you about events. I know I’ve been known for doing that. I want to get into today’s episode. Let’s get into talking about my writing process.

Ben over in the Facebook group today asked me this morning if I could talk a little about how I go about writing blog posts. He particularly wanted to know how I outline my posts and then how I go about ordering the writing process; when do I write headlines, introductions, and that type of thing.

I started to write back a rather long post to Ben describing what I go through. As I was writing it, I realized I’ve never really fully run through that whole process on this podcast. That’s what I want to do today. I hope it will be helpful for you. I have touched on some of the different things that I’m going to talk about in previous episodes, so I’m not going to rehash all of that today. I’ll refer you back to some of those episodes as we go along.

Let’s get into it. The first thing that I do is pretty logical, really. It’s to pick a topic. Pick something that I want the post to be about. I should say this process really does apply to creating videos on YouTube or a podcast even. I went through almost this exact process in preparing this podcast. I actually use a very similar process when I’m creating a talk as well, a presentation, a keynote presentation.

This, for me, given the type of blogs that I have is almost always about either identifying a question that one of my readers is asking that I can answer, or identifying a problem that one of my readers has that they’re trying to overcome, or identifying a task that someone is trying to complete, or identifying a goal that someone is trying to reach.

I’m a teaching blogger, I’m a how-to kind of blogger. 95% of my posts are how to content. I always start with one of those things; a question, a problem, a process, a task, or a goal that someone is trying to achieve. Generally, that defines the topic of my post. I’m coming from that perspective today as a teaching blogger, I’m sure other people would choose topics based upon other things but that’s where I’m coming from.

Number two, this is something I think is really important, I don’t see too many other people writing about this when they outline their process. Number two for me is to remind myself of my reader. I’ve kind of eluded to this in my first point, picking a topic, because almost all the posts that I write tend to come out of questions or problems or goals that my readers have. In this step, I take a moment before I write anything to try and imagine the situation of my reader. You are so much more effective in your blogging if you write with your reader in mind, if you write to your reader. I think it’s really important to pause before you write, to picture your reader.

I’ve talked in previous episodes about how I’ve got avatars or reader profiles. I think I talked about this in Episode 33, about how to develop an avatar. In this step, I go a little bit deeper and I try and write a sentence before I write anything else about who my reader is and how they look at this topic, how they view the topic that I’m talking about, the perspective that they might have on this topic.

If I’m writing about a problem, why do they have that problem? Why does my typical reader have that problem? How do they feel about that problem? What have they previously tried to overcome that problem? What has stopped them from solving that problem in the past? Take a few minutes to put yourself in the shoes of your reader. This might be about you going back in time to when you had that problem or when you had that question, and actually just let yourself marinate in the situation of your reader for a moment because if you write from that perspective with that person in mind, you’re going to be so much more effective in your writing. You’re going to write with empathy and you’re going to write a relevant piece of content for them. You’re not going to write a hypothetical post, you’re going to write something that’s going to solve a person’s problem.

Let me give you a really quick example. I might choose to write a post on my photography blog answering a really common question that we get quite a bit. The question we often get is, “How should I light my portraits?” That’s a typical question we get. It’s a good question, but there’s a lot of different ways that I can approach that question depending on who is asking the question. My readers, who are they? What type of gear do they have? What type of budget do they have to buy new gear? What type of experience or level are they at in their photography?

If I was doing this for my readers on Digital Photography School, I’d write a short sentence or two describing my reader. If I was doing this for DPS readers, I might identify that a lot of our readers are just starting out with photography, they’re beginners. Their perspective, their viewpoint of lighting a portrait is they don’t even know where to start. They may not have too much lighting gear at their fingertips, they may have one flash, they may not even have a flash, they might be just using lights around their home, they might be on a real budget.

Knowing that gives me a viewpoint to write that article from, it gives me a perspective to tackle, it gives me a real understanding of who might be reading their article. I’m not going to write an article about how to light a portrait with professional photography gear in this case, I’m going to write something from the perspective of someone just starting out. Think about your reader, think about the situation they’re in, the feelings they have, the questions that they have around your topic. The more you can do thinking around that, the better position you’re going to be in to outline an article and to write that article with real empathy and in a relatable way.

The other thing I’m thinking about when I’m thinking about my reader is what do I want them to do after reading my article? Thinking about the call to action before you start writing anything is really important because it will shape your article, it will shape your headline, it will shape your introduction, it will shape the way you write your main part of the content, and it will shape your conclusion. Don’t just get to the end of your article and ask yourself, “What do I want my readers to do now?” Ask that question before you start writing.

Number three, create a working headline. This is something that I’ve actually changed my perspective on, I used to write the article and then write a headline. I know some people prefer to do it that way and that’s totally fine, I understand that perspective. What I like to do is spend a little bit of time taking that topic, taking that reader perspective, and trying to come up with a headline. I find that sometimes in the creating of a working headline that I find a unique angle to write the post from, particularly given the work I’ve just done on understanding my readers.

If I want to take that example a little bit further, the question I’m writing about is how do I light a portrait. I’ve done the work in understanding my reader, I understand they’re beginners, they don’t have much lighting gear. I might brainstorm headlines and come up with things like how to light a portrait using lights you find around your home. That might be something that interests that type of reader. Or, how to light a portrait when you’ve only got one flash.

They’re not really fully formed headlines yet, but they’re good enough for a working headline. I might choose one of those. Really, by coming up with a variety of those type of headlines, I actually now have an angle for my article. I might take that one how to light a portrait using the lights that you find around your home, that gives me the whole article. I can start to think about what lights do I have around the home and begin to construct that particular article. Or if I choose the one how to light a portrait with just one flash, I now have the boundaries of what that article needs to be about. For me, creating that working headline upfront sometimes just gives a little bit more tightness to what the article is about.

I will say, it’s important that this is just a working headline, it’s just a working title. I often, if not always, go back and tweak and change the headline later after I’ve written the article, or sometimes even as I’m writing the article I’m thinking about I need to change that headline a little bit.

I do talk a lot about headlines in Episode 156. If headlines is something you want to learn more about, I give you a variety of different ways to come up with a great headline for your article in that episode 156.

Number four is to brainstorm and list the main points or the main teaching of your article. I’m coming from someone who’s teaching in most of my articles. For me, it’s about trying to construct something that is going to teach people or is going to convince people of something. At this point, I’m not really writing a lot, I’m coming up more with a bullet point list, and I do this in a text document on my computer, sometimes I’ll do it on a notepad or I’m doing this in mind mapping. I did talk about that in Episode 182. I use a couple of softwares to create mind maps. Sometimes, for some of my larger articles, I like to visualize it. In many cases, it’s about doing it on a piece of paper or on a text document.

I’m trying at this point to brainstorm the answers to the questions that I’ve identified, or solutions to problems, I’m outlining the steps that a reader needs to go through to learn a new skill or master a process. I’m really trying to add the bones to the article, I’m not adding muscles, I’m not really adding much at this point. I’m just coming up with bullet points. Those bullet points will often become subheadings in my articles. I tend to almost start with a list, my articles don’t always end up as a list although sometimes they do. I find that by coming up with some main subheadings for my article for the main sections, and then beginning to come up with a few sub points for each of those sections, that’s where the article begins to form for me.

This is really the outlining process. I often start with more points than I actually end up using in the article. I’m thinking about all the possible things I could write and then I begin to call it down and come up with the main things that I want to say, the most valuable things.

I don’t get too precious about how many points I’m going to make, I know some bloggers only create lists of seven things. I don’t do that, I use as many points in my articles as I think are useful and I try and make it the best article I can. Some of my articles and podcasts have one point, sometimes it’s most effective if you’ve just got one big idea, and sometimes I have up to 20 or 30. I think I had a podcast recently with 21 points in it.

It’s about trying to come up with what you’re going to say, outline that in a bullet point or in a mind map in some ways. You may want to write a sentence about what you’d say in each of those sections, or some sub bullet points as well.

I think it’s really important to arrange those points in the right order. This is something I think a lot of bloggers could improve their writing by just taking a moment or two to ask themselves is this the right order? Is it a logical order? Are my points building upon one another?

Most articles, it’s much more effective to put them in a logical order, in an order that builds momentum and makes sense to your readers. Spend some time on that. At this point, I’m still outlining, I try and take a bit of a critical look at the outline I’ve come up with. When I’m happy with the outline, I look at it and then I start to ask myself some hard questions. This sometimes isn’t a very nice process, but sometimes things like is this outline going to be useful? Usually, you can tell from an outline whether it’s going to be a lightweight article or whether it’s gonna be really useful. Is someone going to have a fist pump moment when they read this article, given the points you’ve come up with, or are they going to say that was okay? “They got me to click but it didn’t really change my life.” Is that article useful? Is it meaningful? Is it going to change someone’s life in some way?

What questions might people still be asking at the end of reading that type of article, looking at the points that you’re going to make. Will they have some questions? Make note of what those questions are. Is there something that you don’t know as the author yet about this topic that you really should know? Sometimes when we write articles, we get to the end of the article and we go, “I didn’t really know enough about that. I should’ve done some research on that.” What arguments and objections might people have about this article having a look at that outline?

I think it’s really important to ask those types of questions, be critical about the outline that you’ve come up with. Don’t just ask those questions at the end when you’ve written the whole thing. I think it’s important to ask some of those questions as you’re drafting an outline for your article. Because sometimes, at this point in the process, you realize that you need to go away and do some research, or that you need to go away and ask some questions of your own to learn more about that particular topic, or maybe at this point having asked those questions you think actually this is a bit of a weak article, I’m not going to write it.

That’s happened to me many times, I’d much rather come to that conclusion that this is not a strong article. At that point then after I’ve already written something because that’s going to take me several hours more. Ask some of those critical questions at this point. It may be that you need to go away and do some research. I try not to look at what other people have written too early in the process, I like to outline my article first, and then do some research and see what other people have written to see if there’s any other ways that I can improve it. I tend to do that later. It’s also really important to make note of who inspired you so that you can give some credit for that as well.

The other thing you might want to do, having asked some of those questions, if you realize that the article is not going to be strong enough, you may want to go away and seek some help from other people. You can seek help by reading other people’s articles, but maybe there’s someone you can do an interview with or ask some questions or even get them to write a section of your post for you. This point in the drafting of your post, it’s important to have asked those questions so that you can put in place answers to the objections people will have, that you can strengthen something that’s shaping up to be weak.

Number five is where we begin to work on the introduction. I do know that some people wait until after they’re written their article and then go back and write their introduction, in the same ways that people sometimes do that for their headline. I, again, find that for me, writing the introduction upfront is good, it helps me get into the flow as a writer. Sometimes, I find that if I’ve written an introduction, again it shapes the direction of the article and it helps me to write the rest of the article faster and more in the flow. I will say as with a headline, I will often go back and re-work an introduction later, I think it’s important to do that. I find for me writing that introduction early is good.

When you’re doing your introduction, a few things I’ll say about that. Again, as you’re writing an introduction, be really thinking about your reader and their position, the questions and the feelings that they have. I think a good introduction not only identifies the topic, which is important, but it also should empathize with the reader. It should show your reader that you understand their situation, that you understand the question they have or the problem they have and how they feel about that. I think if you can show some empathy in those first few lines, you’ll make a deeper connection with your reader and that will drive them to want to read the rest of your article. Show them that you know how they feel, that you understand their situation, rather than you’re just writing a hypothetical article on a topic.

Paint a picture also of what the benefits of them reading the rest of your article are. You might want to make a promise, you might want to say this is an outcome that you’ll have as a result of reading this article. They’re the type of things that I would put in an introduction. For me, an introduction is generally between one and three paragraphs. As I’ve said, this will get reworked later, it’s a working introduction.

Point number six is to expand your main points. With the introduction written, I then tackle each of the previously outlined points that I’ve gone through in putting that outline together. This is where I write the bulk of the article, this is where I spend a lot of time. Sometimes for me, it will take a couple hours to write a couple thousand words or a thousand words, sometimes it will take me a couple of days to really work through this depending on how hard it is and whether I’m in the flow or not of writing. Generally, what I do is take a bullet point from my outline and come up with a subheading for that part of the article. And then, I write a paragraph or two or three, or maybe a little bullet list as part of that article.

I try and stick to the outline I’ve previously come up with, but it’s not unusual for me to also be thinking of more things that I can say as I’m going. I’ll either make note of the other ideas I’m getting on a piece of paper next to me, or I might add them to the outline that I already come up with.

I also find as I’m writing articles, I get ideas for new articles. It’s often in this part of the process that I’ll be tempted as I’m writing to take a tangent. I’ve trained myself to be aware that sometimes those tangents take in the middle of an article are actually new blog posts. I think it’s really useful to have somewhere as you’re writing that you can just brain dump other ideas that you get, or other questions that you think readers might have that relate to your topic.

Really, point number six here is about expanding the main points. It’s adding meat to those bones that you’ve come up with earlier in your article. You can see here that I tend to write my articles in the order that my readers read them. For me, this is really important. I write the headline, the introduction, the main part of the article.

Point number seven is really moving onto the conclusion. The age old advice of Aristotle says, “Tell them what you’ll say,” that’s your introduction. “Then, tell them,” which is the main part of your article. “And then tell them what you just told them,” this is the conclusion. Good articles have some kind of a conclusion. For me again, I do this after I’ve written the bulk of the article. Once I know what I’ve told them, I then try and sum up my teaching in some way.

Usually for me, this is about trying to return to the problem or the question that I set out in the introduction to tackle, to remind people what I’ve tried to teach them. Give them a bit of a summary of the main points again. You’ve probably heard me do this in the podcast quite a bit. I generally go back through the points that I’ve made, put them in a nice, quick summary statement. And then, it’s important to ask your readers to take some kind of action and to go back to that thing that you identified right at the start that you want your readers to do and then ask them to do that. It’s important not to ask them to do too many things but clearly state the one thing you want them to do next. Make it very clear what you want them to do. That can really be anything. Depending on the article, it could be to do something that you’ve been just teaching them to do. Go away and try this technique I’ve just talked about, or it might be something more about leaving a comment, or telling a story, or responding and interacting with what you’ve done in some way. There’s no right call to action, it really has to flow from the goals of your blog and the goals of this particular article.

Number eight, before I do any editing, I’m looking to polish and add depth in some way. I think almost every article could be improved in some way, and not just by editing, there can be more added to it. Could you add a story? Could you add an image? Could you go and find a video on YouTube that you can embed into it? Could you create a chart that illustrates something that you’ve done? How could you make it look better and how can you make the content actually be better? Could you go away and find a quote from someone and add that particular thing in? Could you go away and do a little mini interview with someone to add in some of their ideas, with maybe an alternative viewpoint to what you’ve written. It’s really important to make your content look really good but to add depth to it as well.

Step number nine, the last one I want to talk about, is to edit and proofread. You’ve spent a lot of time by this point steering over your article but you need to take a little bit of a step back at this point and do some editing. For me, I find putting a bit of space between when I write and when I edit is really important. I think we use different parts of our brains for this more critical thinking about editing. I suggested seven steps for editing your work in Episode 168, but I do want to emphasize it’s so important to do. You waste all that energy by publishing something that’s not quite good enough and that’s got glaring mistakes in it. Do some editing, or get someone else to help you with that particular process. Build editing and proofreading into your workflow. Quality control really does matter.

To summarize that, because all good conclusions have a summary, pick your topic, number one. Number two, remind yourself of your reader, do a little bit of work about putting yourself in their shoes. Number three, create a working headline. Number four is to brainstorm and to list the main points of your article. Number five, write a working introduction. Number six, expand the main points. Number seven is write a conclusion and call to action. Number eight is to polish. I should’ve said in the polishing stage for me, that’s where I go back to my headline, I go back to my introduction, and rework those so that they’re not just working headlines, working introductions, they are the final ones. Number nine is to edit and proofread your content.

That’s my workflow. I would love to know how this differs from yours, what you would add into it. I wrote a whole series of posts on this topic quite a few years ago now on the ProBlogger blog. I’m going to link back to that because I think it’s still relevant today, I do go into more depth in each of the things that I’ve talked about. I also have another one right at the end about what to do after you’ve published your content as well.

The title of that series was actually called How To Craft A Blogpost, 10 Crucial Points To Pause. The whole idea of that series was that I think a lot of bloggers—I’ve done this myself. It’s so tempting to just bang out a blogpost, just bang out an article and hit publish and put it out there. The whole point of that series, and hopefully of this particular episode, is that I think it’s so important to take your time and to craft the content that you have. That means pausing to ask question, pausing to imagine your reader, pausing to make it better, to add depth, to polish. Crafts people don’t just bang out art, they really take their time and they add depth to it. They make it the best it can be. I think it’s important that we do that with our content.

Whatever workflow you have, I really encourage you to pause along the way to be reflective about it, to ask those questions along the way. Most importantly, to really keep coming back to who is reading that content. On the other end of that content is a human being who has needs, who has problems, who has feelings, who has a situation that they’re in, and to really spend a little bit of time throughout this whole process, to picture them, to understand them, and to write for them. It’s such an important thing. Your content will rise in quality, it will rise in relevance to people, and it will be the type of thing that people will want to share because they feel connected to you if you go to that extra effort of understanding who’s on the other side of that content. Craft your content, don’t just create it, craft it, take your time with it.

You can find today’s show notes with all the further listening that I mentioned along the way over at problogger.com/podcast/186. I hope you found this one useful, and also as I said before, check out the ProBlogger Podcast Listeners Facebook Group where we do have some details of some upcoming events, particularly an event coming up in the US. Love to connect with you and hopefully even meet you and see you there.

Thanks for listening today, I’ll chat with you in Episode 187.

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By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

How Persistence, Patience, and Authenticity Helped One Entreprenuer Achieve His Wildest Dreams – Jeremy Slate

Posted from http://addicted2success.com/podcasts/how-persistence-patience-and-authenticity-helped-one-entreprenuer-achieve-his-wildest-dreams-jeremy-slate/

Welcome once more to the “How to Be a Grownup Podcast Breakdown”!  My name is Erik Andress and I am the host of this show.  Today, I am humbled and grateful to bring you the words and wisdom of entrepreneur Jeremy Slate!  He has a fascinating story of redemption and hustle that we all can learn something valuable from.

Check out this podcast interview with Jeremy to learn all his tips, tricks, and techniques that he wants you to know to live a empowered life:
While there were a lot of gems this ambitious entrepreneur dropped, here are the three most important ways Jeremy believes that you can do to revolutionize your business and personal life:

1. Connect to others with authenticity and genuine compassion

We live in this weird time right now.  We live in a time in which it is seemingly socially acceptable for two young people on a date to be staring at their cell phones as opposed to each other. We live in a time where people automate their social media responses and text back pre-written answers to people that attempting to contact them. This practice of detached communication is slowly eroding our ability to connect with each other.  Over the course of my conversation with Jeremy Slate, we discussed the profound power that lies behind authentic communication.

Want to differentiate yourself from other people? Use heart-centered and compassionate communication. Be the person that tells a potential client the unfettered truth. Be the person that tells your significant other that they are deeply meaningful to you. Be the person that resolves disputes with co-workers peaceably while still recognizing the humanity in them. Be the person that goes out of your way to tell your teacher or professor that you are very grateful for the opportunity to learn under them. There are so many individuals out there right now trying to find that romantic partner, trying to start and sustain their own entrepreneurial venture, trying to get to the top of their class in their respective academic institutions. If you want to stand out from the crowd, do so by communicating in a much more meaningful way. It doesn’t take much more than a few kind words, eye contact, and a willingness to persist in conversation even when you have a deep desire to grab your iPhone from your pocket and start flipping through Instagram once more!

“The way we communicate with others and ourselves, ultimately determines the quality of our lives.” – Tony Robbins

2. Persistence and patience are key components of success

I will admit it. As a former English teacher, I love clichés. The reason I do is that there is a kernel of truth for us to learn from in each of them. One of my favorites is, “Rome wasn’t built in a day.” I think that this particular platitude is so important for us to keep in mind because of the kind of culture that you and I have gotten used to living in is infatuated with getting things handed to them instantaneously. It feels deeply frustrating to me that so many young people are obsessed with the idea of instant gratification or attaining their goals immediately.

In reality, all good things in our lives have to be fought for.  A business is not built overnight. It takes countless hours and a lot of sweat equity to develop and demonstrate your value in the marketplace. A great relationship does not come immediately. A long term and sustainable relationship is one that you have to work on. Graduating at the top of your class is no easy feat. To be that kind of young scholar, you need to accept the fact that you will have many late nights in study groups, with tutors and with your nose shoved in a book. Be patient and continue to push. When you apply this principle to your life, you will absolutely start to see the success that you want to have!

Your legacy is being written by yourself.  Make the right decisions Gary Vaynerchuk

3. Have an undying faith in your dream and your grind

There is a price for success that most people are unwilling to pay. Unfortunately, while I am a proud educator, I believe that our schools have failed many of you in that regard. For much of your young life you have had your hands held, you have been told that you are special, and anytime that you complain about your challenges, you have been given a copious amount of help. Sadly, as many of you know, this is a far cry from what you will experience in the real world.

There are always going to be that was the doubt you. There are going to be those that see you in the early stages of your journey toward success, and they will take that opportunity to try to tear you down. They will take that opportunity to try and laugh at you. Nevertheless, this is the time that you need to fight the hardest. This is the time that you need to believe the most in that dream that keeps you awake at night. Understand that you don’t need the approval of others to chase your version of success. You don’t need other people to co-sign the thing that you wish for the most. If your teacher doesn’t believe that you have the ability to find real success in the classroom, show them differently. If your significant other doesn’t believe that you can be a better partner to them, show them differently. If your business partner or clientele don’t see you as a leader, show them differently. The universe does not shape you, you shape the universe!

“Every time I wake up, I am thinking that I am alive, this is the day!  This is an opportunity.” – Eric Thomas

I hope you’ve enjoyed the “How to Be a Grownup Podcast!”  If you have some takeaways from the interview I missed, SOUND OFF in the comments below.


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

15 Dominative Ways to Fail Forward With Grace

Posted from https://wealthygorilla.com/15-ways-fail-forward/

Failure, that annoying thing that happens to all of us; Some fear it while others welcome it… But what if I told you that there’s no such thing as failing, only opportunities. What if I also told you that you can actually fail forward with grace, class, sophistication and even look cool doing it?   […]


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

How To Be The Person Everyone Respects In 3 Simple Steps

Posted from http://addicted2success.com/success-advice/how-to-be-the-person-everyone-respects-in-3-simple-steps/

My mentor always tells me that he respects me. You know when someone gives you a compliment, and it feels really weird? That’s how I feel when he says it. Respect is something that has always been strange to me. I feel like I can only be respected based on my current track record.

I feel like once I hit a speed bump in my life, I have to earn respect all over again. Why does my mentor say he respects me? It’s kind of hard to pinpoint. It’s a bit like saying why do I love a certain someone the way I do. I don’t know, it’s kind of a “woo woo” feeling you get that makes no sense.

Being respectful is about living in a way where you have attractive values that others appreciate. Having values is one thing, but what people who are respected do is live them. I have made several new values in the last couple of years. They include:

– Treat your body like a temple

– Acknowledge and comprehend someone’s opinion even if it’s different to yours

– Give more of yourself than anybody else

– Put people above everything else

Without respect, you feel like a big piece of your soul is missing. Respect gives you something that so few people have: it gives you people’s trust. When people respect you, they give you a break and create a sense of freedom in your life. In a work environment, this is like saying, “Do what you love, whenever you want, and we’ll support you.”

Feels pretty amazing if you ask me. That last line sums up a lot of my working life. But it hasn’t been all roses. My life has had low points just like yours. I’ve had moments in my life where no one respects me and where I felt alone. Loneliness has a lot to do with the way others feel about you.

When people respect you, it’s like a superhero trait. You all of a sudden have some confidence in your life that says, “I got this baby!” When sickness knocks you down, you just feel like people have your back. My cancer scare taught me this a few years ago.

“It’s because of respect that I was able to foster the belief that anything is possible”

If I look at my life now, I feel that I’m at an all-time level high in the level of respect I get from everyone in my life. It didn’t happen in 5 minutes though. It took five years of working my butt off and doing what I said I would do.

The crux of respect is really just about keeping your word. Things got even crazier when I did more than I said I would. It’s at that level that people’s respect for you goes through the roof. Is it so hard to do this? No, it’s actually pretty easy and just takes discipline.

To reiterate, to gain more respect you need to set the following three goals:
  1. A)   Keep your word
  2. B)   Treat others like they are royalty
  3. C)   Stay focused and don’t veer away from your values

I want to talk about Seinfeld for a second. The guy’s a comical genius, and if he doesn’t make you laugh then there may be something wrong with you… kidding. In a speech I heard yesterday, Seinfeld says that his success is based on habit.

Quite clearly, what he said is that all you need to do is the following:

  • Buy a paper calendar
  • Get a permanent red marker
  • Every day, put a big X through the day if you spent time on your passion

Not a bad formula for success. You could almost use these three steps for any goal. Respect is no different, and you could apply the same principle. Every day, put an X through the day if you kept to the three goals above. Once it’s a habit, respect will flow into your life like a freight train speeding down a railway track.

The challenge with respect is like most things in life: it’s just too bloody complicated. It’s like a foreign matter from Mars that nobody knows how to bring back to Earth. It’s not easy to articulate. Complex things rarely get achieved, so dumb it right down.

To be in control of your mind, remain disciplined, and treat others with respect, you can try the following three practices:

 

1. Write your thoughts down

Respect is gained when you can demonstrate to others that your mind is under control. People respect you when you treat them well. It’s hard to be nice to people if you are walking around with a head full of negative thoughts.

Through blogging, I’ve learned to write my thoughts down and get them out of my head. This allows me, during work hours, to have a clearer mind that can be focused on treating others well. I am able to remember what’s important to the various people I interact with, and this helps me build rapport. Rapport is the gateway to respect.

It’s hard for someone to respect you if they don’t have rapport with you. If you aren’t into blogging like me, then try something like doing five minutes of journaling. There’s a great journal called The Five-minute Journal which has a good guide. Get used to expressing yourself through writing.

 

2. Tell people you appreciate them

It’s funny how the things that make people respect us are almost too easy not to do. One of those things is to tell people you appreciate them. I don’t mean in a fake kind of way. The best way is to do it only if you mean it, and put lots of passion into your voice.

The approximate time needed to do this is something like sixty seconds a day. The results that come from this habit are off the charts.

“People respect you when you appreciate them first”

Respect starts with you taking action first and then the benefits follow. This point is dear to my heart especially with tragedies like the one I recently witnessed where a madman killed people only meters away from me. What if you never got to tell someone how much they meant to you ever again? Do it.

 

3. Say sorry when you mess up

This practice is only very new for me. I make mistakes all the time, just like you do. Until recently, I never said sorry or acknowledged them. Now I do it every time. Last week I offended my friend because he thought I didn’t respect his partner. I said sorry.

The week before, I snapped at someone because I had hardly slept the night before. I told them the next day I was sorry. I got off a train and said some silly things to a train conductor because his voice through the PA was interrupting my mobile phone conversation. I said sorry.

You will be the person everyone respects when you can apologize without being asked when you’ve done something wrong.

 

Outcomes

  1. A)   Within a month, I felt better about myself
  2. B)   Within three months I noticed more people said hello to me
  3. C)   Within six months my advice on social media began to be shared by people I respected
  4. D)   Within a year I became the go-to person for people who are way smarter and more successful than me.

And then, of course, I would experience a challenging life experience and sometimes forget all of the rules I’ve just mentioned. That’s okay. We’re not Superman 24 / 7, chief!

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

Love Isn’t Enough (and Other Lessons from Ending a 6-Year Relationship)

Posted from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/tinybuddha/~3/vWwJaJKf77s/

“Some people think that it’s holding on that makes one strong; sometimes it’s letting go.” ~Unknown

Sometimes we prolong relationships for the sake of comfort and familiarity. We’re fearful of what’s out there, and life without a partner. No matter how many times we’ve been hurt, taken for granted, or had our needs neglected, we still choose to stay even if our mind and heart strongly suggest otherwise.

I thought I was strong for putting up with my ex’s mistreatment. I had held the ability to forgive in high regard, and I wanted to keep that standard.

I’m not exaggerating when I say I’ve been dumped fifty times by the same person, yet I put my happiness aside for them. I can’t even count the number of nights I cried myself to sleep. Even in the shower, I found myself taking longer than I used to because I shed my tears there, where nobody would find out.

The worst part was when I could no longer fully express my feelings to other people due to the fear of getting hurt as I was being hurt in my relationship. I tried hard to numb my emotions so I wouldn’t have to deal with the pain, but that also meant being unable to feel joy or any other positive emotion.

The last straw happened when I went on a three-week vacation in Canada and the United States. We didn’t communicate often due to my ex’s work, and I was touring different places with my family, so Internet wasn’t accessible at all times.

I hadn’t felt so free in a long while. I focused on seeing the world and spending my time with my loved ones, and I didn’t miss my ex one bit. Coming home from a vacation always gave me post-travel depression, but this one hit me much harder, since I knew I had to face the reality of my relationship again.

As expected, within days of my return, my ex and I fought for the nth time. I’ll never forget the exact words that were hurled at me. “You’re a loser. You don’t deserve a vacation.”

The crying and self-loathing came back. Except this time, I knew I had a choice and realized that I was choosing my own heartbreak. I remember the freedom I’d felt while away and decided I wanted that feeling wherever I went.

It might have been a hard pill to swallow, but after six years of an on-again, off-again relationship, I came to the conclusion that it was time to break it off for good.

The process was far from easy. It was a messy and dramatic breakup, and it took two months until there was absolutely no contact between us. No texts, no calls, no emails or messages on messenger apps, nothing.

We were together for six years, starting in my teens, so initially I had no idea how to move on from somebody who had been present while I was building my identity as a person.

Times like these put us in deep contemplation. We ask ourselves, “Is the sole purpose of my existence for him/her?” Or we tell ourselves, “No one else can make me happy.”

Well, I’m here to tell you that, no, those things aren’t true.

It’s been almost a year now, and things have been incredible for me. I am proud to say that I have moved on 100 percent from my past relationship.

The following are lessons I’ve learned along the way:

1. Love alone is never enough.

Formerly, I firmly believed that “love conquers all.” Never mind the problems, never mind the emotional abuse, never mind the important stuff we could never agree on; as long as there was love, everything would fall into place. But it didn’t.

I loved my ex very much and was loved back, but that didn’t change that I’d been disrespected. It didn’t change that my needs weren’t being met, despite how vocal I was about them. Is it even possible to love somebody who constantly degrades you?

We were unable to make it because while love was there, respect and understanding weren’t. I was too wounded to express all my thoughts and feelings because I knew they would only fall on deaf ears. Our relationship consisted of never-ending fights, and the false idea that love would solve our problems.

When I recognized how much self-respect and dignity I’d sacrificed, I realized that relationships need more than love to be successful.

Love is a powerful thing. We need it, it feels good, but we shouldn’t use it to justify losing ourselves.

2. You’re worthy, with or without a partner.

Other single people around me complain about their relationship status and use it as the basis of their self-worth. I used to think that way too, until I imagined what the future would be like if I continued to have that mentality.

If I retained that mentality, I would never truly be happy because I would always be dependent on my partner for love. I would always need that external validation instead of focusing on how I felt about myself.

Since my breakup, I choose to love myself through daily actions. I get more sleep at night, commit myself to a workout routine, eat healthier, and spend time around people who make me feel good about myself.

I happily accept the love I receive from friends and family because I know that I’m worthy, and I’m deserving of good things in this world.

3. Life is uncertain and we must embrace it.

My ex and I planned to live in a small house, with lots of dogs, and travel the world. We were going to run away from my parents, who didn’t approve of us, and live happily ever after. We weren’t going to have any kids, but we were going to pour ourselves into charity.

At least, that was the plan.

When a relationship is new, everything is great. I thought we’d eventually get married and execute all our plans easily. I was treating it like a fairy tale and refused to believe that we were less than perfect for each other. Fast-forward six years later, almost everything drastically changed.

After the breakup, the uncertainty scared me. I asked myself what was going to happen to me now that I didn’t have any plans. I never knew that freedom could be so terrifying and liberating at the same time.

I didn’t let the fear of the unknown stop me from following through with my decision. If I had stayed, the same problems would have continued occurring. Nothing would have changed. I knew I would never be happy staying in something that was detrimental to my self-esteem.

Of course, leaving my unhealthy relationship doesn’t guarantee my next one will work out; it just means I’ve opened myself up to the possibility of finding a suitable partner.

The happiest people in history never settled for less than what they deserved when pursuing their goals. The same should apply in our search for a life partner. It’s only by knowing our worth that we’re able to find real, lasting love.

Profile photo of Nicah Caramba

About Nicah Caramba

Nicah Caramba is an entrepreneur who is passionate about self-improvement, travel and Japanese food. She is constantly looking for ways to make progress daily to achieve personal growth. If you’re interested in changing your life, visit her website todayimchanging.com or connect with her on Twitter.

Get in the conversation! Click here to leave a comment on the site.

The post Love Isn’t Enough (and Other Lessons from Ending a 6-Year Relationship) appeared first on Tiny Buddha.


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The One Type Of Blog Post That Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

Posted from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProbloggerHelpingBloggersEarnMoney/~3/lCXj6mSOD2U/

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

This is a guest contribution from Joe Elliott.

How hard can it be when you start a new blog, you create crazy amounts of content and then you need to start generating traffic?

You bust your butt off to get 20 posts so that you can say you are good to go.

You reach out to influencers only to meet their trashcan. You even submit a ton of pitches for a guest post… again only to get an instant delete!

It sucks!

The truth is this is the old school way of doing this blogging game. Content is still king but your job nowadays is to create content that can generate traffic easily on its own.

Today I am going to share with you the exact strategy I use to create a traffic generating expert roundup post. I will show you the best outreach tips I have to ensure your contributors say yes.

Once this post is live and doing its job you have the social proof I mentioned before and you will get your first few visitors with ease!

Are you ready?

Find A Proven Content Idea That Will Drive Your Audience Wild!

Every topic in your niche that your audience would be interested in has been covered. Having said that, you can still create a better resource that has your very own unique take on the topic.

When you first start a blog you want to create content that has been a success on other blogs. If it has done well before then there is no reason why it can’t take off again.

That is if you do the topic justice!

An expert roundup post that is based on a killer topic will blow your readers mind easily. This post type is stuffed with legendary tips, it’s bursting with value.

So how can you find these topics that have proven their worth?

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

First head over to Google and search for a broad topic in your niche. This will show you the content that has managed to make the first page of Google. It’s the best content on Google.

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

Now take each post on the front page of the search results and enter them into Buzzsumo. This will show you the most shared content from this website.

As you go through each you should see similar topics on multiple blogs. When you see the same topic a few times you are onto a good thing.

That’s your PROVEN topic!

Now all that’s left to do is to turn this into a question.

Head over to Quora and type in your hot topic, now pick a question that your audience is looking for and that get’s some traction (how many upvotes does it have). This rocks because the influencers will want to be featured because it’s a popular topic and your audience are happy because it’s a popular question.

Create A List Of Influencers That Are Desperate To Share Your Expert Roundup Post

Now you have that killer question it is time to create a spreadsheet to input all your influencer buddies into.

The spreadsheet should have a column for their name, blog name, their URL, email and social media accounts. I also add a column for me to write accepted or leave blank. It pays to be organized!

I always start by entering the details for people I know first because you have a track record with them they will be more likely to get involved. Just make sure that they are relevant to the topic. Nobody wants to know what Sports player thinks about SEO, really.

Big celebrity bloggers, these are the ones that every marketer knows, like Darren Rowse, Neil Patel, Amy Porterfield, Pat Flynn etc…

They will be the hardest people to get a hold of because of the sheer amount of email they get daily. Some even have a VA which makes it even harder to get to their inboxes. The best way to get straight to these people is to find someone who knows them and ask them for a connection.

If they fit the bill for your roundup then you should start trying to get on their radar about 6 months out.

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

Big Audience Bloggers are the bloggers who could still transform your blog because of their big audience. They may still not be at Neil Patel level but they have some decent influence.

You now have a better chance of getting your email read but if you have not taken the time to get on their radar they won’t reply. If you form a relationship with these people most will help you with your expert roundup post.

Credibility Building Bloggers, these are the bloggers that know their stuff but are still building their audience. They have some influence and have connections with the big dogs! You will find these bloggers by looking at other roundups. If they have featured one of the big guys you should definitely consider them because that shows there is a connection there!

The little guys, we all gotta start somewhere. These dudes will promote your post like mad because they want to show that they have been featured amongst the big dogs.

Always consider these dudes –  if they make it before you, well it’s another connection!

So get started by filling out your spreadsheet with all the bloggers you want to feature in your post.

I would always aim for at least a hundred. Not all will get back but it should get you at least 20 if you crack the next bit…

Nail Your Outreach For An Awesome Roundup Post

Now that you have got a big list of bloggers to reach out to it is time to craft a killer outreach email to get their answer. Check out this article by Jason Quey where he shares his best strategy to get in touch with any kind of influencer.

Most newbies screw this bit up because they feel the need to make their email request all about them or they do not get on the radar well enough!

Hard fact, nobody is going to help you if your number one topic is yourself. If you met someone on the street for the first time and asked for $10, what would their response be?

If you do a good deed for someone, however, you are more than likely to get more in return. Work on forming a relationship!

Start by reaching out to the big dogs these bloggers will take a bit more time to get them on your side. The best way to get on their radar is to start commenting on their blogs, or reaching out to them on social media…

This is how I got in contact with Jaime Masters at the Eventual Millionaire. I followed up by sending her a personal email thanking her for all her hard work and started connecting from there!

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

The first tip for a successful outreach email is to put the name of the influencer in the subject. You would be surprised how many people use templates and don’t address the influencers by their name at any point in their outreach.

Epic Fail!

This is just rude! When people see their name in the subject they will be more drawn to the email.

Your number on way to get an expert to contribute is to keep the question super easy…

What is your number one tip for new bloggers to start getting traffic?

This is good because it tells the expert who the audience is and the topic getting traffic. It is an easy to answer the question. One tip is plenty because won’t have to write an essay!

Bad Example…

What are the strategies you use to build a blog, list and make money?

This could be a book and you have not stated who the target audience for the post is!

Now the other reason I told you to get the big bloggers first is so that you can drop some social proof into the email. This will help your outreach efforts immensely.

I have got Darren Rowse, Neil Patel, and Yaro Starak’s answers, can I add yours to my list?

When other bloggers see these names they will see that you are working hard to make it a success. This is perfect and will help your efforts to get others involved.

Go The Extra Mile And Let Your Experts Shine

You should be chuffed with your progress, now it is time to put it all together. No matter what keyword you are targeting this post is for the experts to showcase their skills and experience. You have to let them shine.

Create a killer headline that encourages people to click through to your post. I do three things to make sure my headline stands out.

  1. Have the main keyword to tell Google and your readers what the post is about,
  2. Share the benefit the reader can expect from reading the post,
  3. Add some power words that make it impossible to say no. Sarah Peterson has done an awesome job compiling a list of power words on SumoMe.

Lastly, I will ask people what they think. You could ask the experts or create a survey in Facebook groups. Your goal is to make sure it kicks butts but you’re not on your own unless you choose to be.

Now to create an intro that captures and hooks your readers in, if you can get them here surely you can keep them through the post. My intros tend to follow a structure but the main thing is to tell the reader what they can expect from your post…

  1. Introduce the problem that the post will cover,
  2. Tell them that your post is going to solve this very problem,
  3. Introduce the experts and away we go…

List your experts with their Name, website, short bio and their answer. Now again we want to let them shine so do not be afraid to head over to their website and grab screenshot examples, you can even create your own examples so you have unique pictures.

You could have a link to their most popular post (you can find this using Buzzsumo). Go the extra mile and your experts will see that you care and that it’s not just about you!

Lastly end the post by thanking all your experts for their time. Give a quick summary and ask your readers the question.

This will keep the communication going in the comments, more engagement for your blog!

Don’t Be Lazy: Promote Your Post Too

I see a lot of people using these posts to get some exposure for themselves but they leave it all up to the experts. Yes you will get a lot of free promotion, but you have also got a lot of free content, you should thank the experts by getting them maximum exposure.

The first thing that is so simple to implement is Click to Tweet buttons. These make it easy for your readers to share the content. You can download this free plugin for WordPress which makes the job a breeze.

If you want though you can head to ClickToTweet.com and set up a basic link, this gives you a link to add to your roundup where it makes sense.

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

The next thing to do is to create some social media graphics using Canva or any tool of your choice. Showcase one or two experts in these images. Now schedule tweets, Facebook posts, Google+ posts and even Pinterest Pins with these pictures and tag your experts in them.

The next thing I do is schedule an email out to my list, doing the social media stuff first helps to create some shares and sometimes even comments. This is social proof for your own subscribers to see when they get there.

Now there should be a bit of traction, so I will reach out to the experts and let them know it’s live. Make it easy for them to share by including a click to tweet link in the email. You still don’t need to ask them for anything.

Let them decide, most will share anyway because they are featured in the post.

Now before I go I want you to go to your favorite industry publication and find the editor and the most common contributors. Start connecting with these people and make sure the link to your site is easy to find.

If you are using Wisestamp the journalists will see your link in your signature if you email them. If on Twitter they will see your link on your profile. Just be helpful don’t ask them for anything, just mingle. If you play your cards right you could get some major exposure from them!

It’s Over To You

This kind of post can be the most powerful, if you’re not lazy and deliver value to your experts as well as your readers. If you are struggling to get traction or you have a new blog then this type of post is perfect for you.

It might seem like a lot of work but really if you’re not spending time, how can you expect results. Noah Kagen said this in a webinar of his I attended…

The One Type Of Blog Post The Will Transform Your Blog Immediately

This is so true and I think it is something you should keep in mind, not just for roundups but for any post you create!

Have you created an expert roundup post? What were your results like? Let me know in the comments!

Joe Elliott is the founder of One Man Wiki, his blog that shares tips to help you kickstart your blog. If you are a new or struggling blogger his tips will show you how to get traction in no time at all. Take his exclusive free course that will show you how to leverage the power of influencers so you can skyrocket your traffic and subscribers.

The post The One Type Of Blog Post That Will Transform Your Blog Immediately appeared first on ProBlogger.

      


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

Rock Bottom Is Where Your Life Truly Begins

Posted from http://addicted2success.com/motivation/rock-bottom-is-where-your-life-truly-begins/

This week for me has been one of the toughest ever. Again I’m faced with a decision that is so tough I have been frozen in time. I can’t do anything else but think about this decision and wonder where the road will lead. It’s the first time I have had no idea what the answer is.

For a proclaimed self-help leader I should know it all right? I should understand what to do and what the right decision is to make. But I don’t! You’ve probably faced a similar predicament, or you may even be facing this challenge right now.

I’m here to tell you that it’s not over. Once you make this tough decision, you will hit rock bottom for a little while. Don’t worry though because no one stays in that dark, eerie hole forever.

From this frightening place is one of the greatest miracles you will ever experience; the miracle of beginning your life again from rock bottom. This process is like watching an eagle fly again after it’s injured its wings.

“The worst thing you can do is stay at rock bottom and not be the person you were created to be”

You’re here for a reason and so am I. We may not know what that reason is, but we have to continue to search and not give up.

Giving up is for suckers, and you’re not one of those. You may be flat on your face and have no strategy yet. That’s okay because the world is full of strategies. What you need is to agree that it’s time to make a new decision! Time to truly begin your life once and for all and be reborn again!

Here are 6 reasons why rock bottom is where your life begins:

 

1. At the bottom, you let go of everything

When you hit rock bottom, you let go of everything. You start again with nothing and get rid of all the stuff in your life that doesn’t make sense. It’s easy to become misguided and allow people around you to suck you into things that matter to them, but not to you.

For me, I have to let go of a fair bit of baggage in the coming weeks, and it’s all part of the process. This allows me to metaphorically refill my cup of life with new things that will be better than ever before.

We hold onto things in our life because we sometimes can’t bring ourselves to give them up. We think that we will feel a sense of loss, so we resist giving up what we love even though we sometimes know we have to. No one wants to be at rock bottom yet we all have to go there now and then.

It’s the way you think during this difficult time that will determine if you bounce back again. You get to write the words to the next chapter of your life, and the success you will or won’t have is dependent on your mindset. Feeling sorry for yourself is not going to help anybody including you.

 

2. Pain will make you take action

Unless you hit rock bottom, you are unlikely to have enough pain in your life to deal with your problems. Pain motivates you so much when you look at it from a distance. To climb back to the top of the mountain again you need pain to get you there.

Light-in-the-darkPain is the momentum and the motivation you’ve probably needed for most of your life. Fearing and dwelling on the moment of your rock bottom struggles will not make you happy again. It’s highly possible to come back from this difficult position quickly, but you have to embrace your pain to do so.

Don’t settle for second place and let that pain help you rise from the ashes again. All of the people that doubted you and hated you when you were at the top may be pointing at you and laughing. Who cares about them. Put on your boots, go outside, and go stamp in the mud rather than hiding from it.

 

3. Struggle is where it starts

The comfort zone of pizza, beer, TV shows and lack of taking action towards your dream is what’s got you to rock this new position of rock bottom in the first place. You’ve been blessed with struggle as a way for you to think differently about your problems and come up with an innovative solution.

Innovate YourselfThe word innovation is not just for the fancy corporate’s to throw against the wall ten times an hour; it’s entirely possible to innovate on yourself. We can’t fix things that we can’t see, though. Being at rock bottom makes all of your problems, faults, and unhappiness come under the spotlight.

At rock bottom, you gain a new sense of clarity, and you develop the vision to see your life better than it is right now. Let’s face it, at rock bottom, all it takes is someone to smile at you and your life is already better than it was.

Asking yourself the question “Not again, why me” is not going to help your situation. I know I sometimes feel like rock bottom seems to get attracted to me more than anyone else but the facts are I embrace it and become aware of it.

Everyone else I know hides it and doesn’t want to even admit where they are at. This way of living is the true deception.

“Don’t lie to yourself and others; accept the struggle, get back on the horse cowboy, and go shoot some empty glass bottles again like you were five years old”

 

4. You need to be reset just like the economy

Every 7-10 years we go through what has become very well known to us all: a recession. The news stations shout out this phrase like Armageddon is approaching, like we’re all going to die. A recession is nothing more than a reset switch that affects the financial markets.

The stock market and real estate markets can’t go up and up forever. Every few years we need everything to go to hell so we can reset. Rock bottom in your life is no different. When you hit rock bottom, you are mostly just hitting the reset switch on everything you’re currently are experiencing.

Your mind more than anything needs this. If you have a recurring thought in your head like I do, that is stopping you from functioning, then you need to get it out of your head. Rock bottom is the tool we were given to reset ourselves just like our computer.

Rock bottom is a reset of all of your values, beliefs and current goals. It’s a chance to come up with a new vision for your life and find a new network of people to tap into. Nothing in nature stands still, and just like the Peace Lilly sitting next to me as I type these words, we must continue to grow. Civilization must continue to grow.

 

5. At the top, you forget so much

Being at the top of your game can make you forget pretty quickly how you got there. The best part is not being at the top; it’s the journey that you take to get there. It’s the journey where all the lessons are learned, and the momentum occurs.

What better way than to start a new journey beginning with this whole rock bottom period of your life. When you are surrounded by nothing but success you can become self-absorbed in your own BS and sense of worth. You can think you are Superman when really you are a nobody just like me.

For as long as I can remember, every time I’ve reached the top, I’ve forgotten the people that helped me get there and the hard work it took. This time I’m committed to appreciating even the worst bits, like this feeling of rock bottom that I have right now.

This is my second visit to rock bottom in six months to so I’m becoming a bit of an expert…haha. I’m not sure that is a good thing, but I’ll wear it as a badge of honor none the less.

 

6. Your gratitude increases 10X

The final point you need to comprehend about rock bottom is that it’s where your gratitude increases ten times if not, more. When you’ve hit the lowest point, any ounce of good feelings or positive input from people around you feels like you’ve just won one hundred million dollars.

Gratitude Is PowerSuddenly, that friend buying you lunch or that SMS from a work colleague makes you feel unstoppable. As you relearn how to be grateful for the little things again, you give yourself a valuable weapon in this battle we call life.

That’s because life is a battle and it’s not easy for any of us including me. It’s not meant to be a walk in the park, but it can be so much better when you appreciate all that is around you. The only sure fire way to come back from the point of rock bottom is to notice and reinforce your beliefs around gratitude.

There’s nothing better on a day of being at rock bottom than going for a walk in the park or sipping your favorite tea or coffee concoction. You realize that it’s not so much the big wins in your life, but all the small wins that lead up to the ultimate triumph that matter the most. Have you been to rock bottom? What was it like?

If you want to increase your productivity and learn some more valuable life hacks, then join my private mailing list on timdenning.net


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

How To Engage Your Audience with Social News Posts

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How do you attract visitors to your website? How do you grow your tribe? How do you convert casual followers into diehard fans? Many traffic sources exist, of course, and they all have their respective pros and cons. Search engine traffic can be good for that first-time hit, but how are you going to convince those people to stick around? Email traffic can be great, but you’ve got to get people to subscribe in the first place.

Even though algorithm updates continue to mess with our organic reach, social media continues to be an important branding tool for blogs and other websites alike. Even if a person doesn’t necessarily click through on a link to your blog post, you want them to “like” you on Facebook and follow you on Twitter. You want them to be aware of your brand and you want them to be a fan of yours.

But how do you do that?

news-socmed

A recent survey conducted by Pew Research Center revealed that almost two-thirds of American adults get their news from social media and about a third of that demographic does so “often.” You can check that link for more in-depth stats and analysis.

Looking at Facebook alone though, 67% of US adults actively use the social network and 66% of users are getting their news from Facebook. Put those numbers together and about 44% of the total US adult population is getting news from Facebook. That’s huge.

Have you ever noticed the “trending news” section on Twitter or Facebook? Do you browse around on Reddit to see what people are talking about? You’re definitely not alone. Between those three sites, a huge number of users are anxious and eager to read about the latest news. And this is where you can capitalize.

news-bernie

This is profoundly important for a couple of intrinsically related reasons. News posts are timely and if you catch a trending topic, you could gain more organic reach as a natural result. News posts also tend to attract more likes, comments, shares and other engagement, because people are more interested in topics that are immediately relevant.

When Bernie Sanders announced that he is endorsing Hillary Clinton for her bid to become US President, John shared the NBC News video on Facebook. And it got comments from both the left and the right. It’s relevant. It’s timely. It’s on point and big news like this will also elicit a more powerful emotional response.

That emotional response results in more likes, more comments, more shares. This is one way you can engage your followers without necessarily creating brand new content on your blog. It’ll just continue to grow your audience and your tribe through those social channels.

A common mistake that many marketers take with their social media profiles is that they use them solely for promotional purposes. Here is a new course I’m offering. Here’s a new book I published. Here is the next live event where you can hear me speak. Those are all valuable, to be sure, but sharing tangentially related content can further grow your audience and reach new users.

And when you can tap into thousands or even millions of people with just a few quick key strokes, you wield an incredible power to succeed and profit. That’s newsworthy.

How To Make 6-Figure Monthly Online Income! Download John Chow’s New eBook!


By |March 31st, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments

11 Surprising Things Productive Writers Do Differently

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You're reading 11 Surprising Things Productive Writers Do Differently, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.

Robert Greene, Napoleon Hill, William Shakespeare and many others are great writers of all times.  It is obvious that there is something common among all of them; far beyond “sitting down and engaging in the act of writing” that makes them unique. Productive writers usually perform beyond limits. It is interesting to know that some things they do very differently, and other writers in their field do not pay attention to, are what make them exceptionally different. What makes them unique and exceptional among all writers? The following surprising things are what they do differently, and have successfully placed them above other writers.
  • They consider writing a necessity:
Writing, as many view it, is what you do when you have your leisure, or what you can do when there is a need for it. Productive writers don’t see it as such. Their approach to writing is that which is unavoidably necessary. They write as if writing is their living pills.
  • They make writing a daily routine:
Creating a schedule for daily writing will not only make you a productive writer, but also an exceptional one in that field. Unlike other writers, who only write once in a while, or especially when they have a project to work on, productive writers have a plan to write inevitably each day. Even when they have no actual subject to write on, they create new ideas and develop it in writing.
  • They read more than they write:
The most terrible and lovely thing about being a productive writer is that they spend more time reading and studying than writing. Productive writers are of the opinion that, what your writing look like is proportional what you have studied and how well you have understood. They acquire knowledge and ideas through reading, and relate them to writing.
  • They are passionate about writing:
Productive writers understand the need for passion in their business; thus, develop a compelling enthusiasm for writing. They write very often and neither considers it boring nor time wasting, because of the strong emotional attachment they have for what they do.
  • They create time to write:
Everyone is engaged with different activities daily, no matter how busy a productive writer is, he/she will create time to write every day. They do not allow any other activity deprive them of the time to write and commit themselves to writing even it will cost them something.
  • They embrace Research:
Some writers and few non-writers often assume research to be a distraction from doing work. Some also term it to mean, duplicating other people’s work, and they thereby neglect it. The renowned writer Robert Greene spends hundreds of hours researching books like Mastery and The 48 Laws of Power. Successful writers understand the significance of research. They spend adequate time finding answers to questions and then apply the answers in their own cognition to develop their writing.
  • They learn to work without Distraction:
Productive writers are aware of the dangerous impact of distraction, as it can disrupt ideas you have spent time storing in your head. They know quietness and being alone trigger deep thinking that enhances the creative process. Productive writers try to avoid distractions of any form when writing. They create spaces that are comfortable enough to write efficiently, and far from the reach of distraction. Another better approach to tackling distraction and maintaining a productive writing productive writers adopt is the use of text editors and writing apps, like Write! App, Writemonkey, Fargo etc. they enhance writing productivity and ensure distraction-free writing.
  • They take advantage of every idea:
Ideas are essential to writers. They are the foundations of every story and solutions to problems. While other writers ignore most ideas except the ones that meet their immediate needs, productive writers take advantage of every idea that comes their way, with the notion that, it will be useful later.
  • They are not money-focused:
Writing with the primary aim of making money may sometimes end up not yielding. But writing for the love of it without be money-centered will someday bring fortune. This is exactly what most productive writers do; they love to write because they find it fun and interesting, not because they want to turn rich overnight by writing.
  • They prioritize healthiness:
An unhealthy body cannot function properly. When the body is unhealthy, it affects the flow of ideas and presentation of them. Productive writers take good health as their priority, because they know it may successfully keep them away from doing what they love to do. Successful writers go to great lengths to keep themselves physically healthy so they have the strength to come up with new and better ideas.
  • They embrace failure and change:
Sometimes, it is not all what you write readers are interested in reading. You may write a book and do not get acknowledgment in return, readers may condemn what you have labored to produce. This is apparently a common thing in business. It fails and it succeeds. Great writers take advantage of every of their failure to learn. They find the reason for the failure and adjust in their future writing. Being productive in writing requires commitment, dedication, diligence, discipline, passion, focus and tolerance.
Hi, I am David Jameson, a passionate freelance writer and an avid blogger. I like to help people become more successful and productive writers through my blog about writing on Medium. My motto is “We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect“.

You've read 11 Surprising Things Productive Writers Do Differently, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you've enjoyed this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles.


By |March 30th, 2017|Commercial|0 Comments